The Palace

 

The structure of Pascaraymondo Suite Palace tells an ancient history of great historical importance.

Palazzo Pascaraymondo was built in the 16th century by the military architect of the Kingdom of Naples, Gian Giacomo dell’Acaya, known for having created significant historical works such as the walls of the city of Lecce, with its Carlo V Castle, and the Renaissance fortified city of Acaya. The Palace was also the seat of the Consulate of the Empire of Germany and chosen by Emperor William II on the occasion of his visit to the Salento.

Pascaraymondo Suite Palace is located at the beginning, or end, of the main road, Via Antonietta De Pace, depending where you enter the old city.

The noble houses that inhabited the Palace have been different over the centuries: the Pernetta family, the Pasca family and the Raymondo family, who jointly started the Pascaraymondo dynasty. Today the structure is owned by the heirs of the canonist Sebastiano Verona.

The manor house certainly had more construction phases, implemented at different times, which over time led to substantial structural changes to the building. The stucco decorations are surely the most distinctive elements of the architecture of the building.

The building overlooks Via Antonietta De Pace, with its balcony and the large late Baroque door, which leads to a place filled by personalities of the families who lived there, their virtues and passions, art from Pernetta’s Sicily, France from the Pasca era, and the authentic Gallipoli, a fishing town, with intense aromas and lives etched by the wind and the sea.

For the most passionate and curious, the entire Palace offers significant insights on places and local culture, thanks to the presence of historical artifacts, international magazines, publications, memorabilia, paintings, and ancient books.

The main hall of the building is entirely frescoed with paintings from the 1700s, which enchant and delight guests. Equipped with tables and comfortable antique chairs, it is further enhanced by priceless furniture and vintage objects, coupled with an ancient cupboard displaying dishes and cutlery of great value.